‘Students have outstanding attitudes to learning,
which is primarily as a result of good teaching and very positive relationships across the whole academy.’ Ofsted
‘Students behave very well, show high levels of cooperation, respect and courtesy and work highly effectively with each other and their teachers. This creates a very positive learning environment.’ Ofsted

The Langley Academy | PSHE Resources and Information

    Sex and Relationship Education

    What is S.R.E

    S.R.E. is an acronym for Sex and Relationships Education and has replaced the traditional SE – Sex Education. This is to stress that our approach goes beyond provision of biological information to focus on clarifying attitudes and values, and developing self-esteem and the skills to manage relationships. This is in line with the DfES Sex and Relationship Education Guidance (2000). The guidance suggests that SRE should have three main elements as follows:

    Knowledge and understanding

  • Learning and understanding physical development at appropriate stages.
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  • Understanding human sexuality, sexual health, emotions and relationships

    Attitudes and values

  • Learning the importance of values and individual conscience and moral considerations
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  • Learning the value of respect, love and care.
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  • Exploring, considering and understanding moral dilemmas.
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  • Developing critical thinking as part of decision making

    Personal and social skills

  • Learning to manage emotions and relationships confidently and sensitively.
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  • Developing self-respect and empathy for others
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  • Learning to make choices based on an understanding of difference and without prejudice.
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  • Developing an appreciation of the consequences of choices made
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  • Managing conflict.
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  • Learning how to recognize and avoid exploitation and abuse.

    For more information and guidance when addressing this topic at home, please see the below link to some helpful strategies:

    Link

    Prevent

    What is Prevent?

    Prevent is about safeguarding people and communities from the threat of terrorism. Prevent is 1 of the 4 elements of CONTEST, the Government’s     counter-terrorism strategy. It aims to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism

    The Prevent Strategy:

  • Responds to the ideological challenge we face from terrorism and aspects of extremism, and the threat we face from those who promote these views;
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  • Provides practical help to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism and ensure they are given appropriate advice and support; and
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  • Works with a wide range of sectors (including education, criminal justice, faith, charities, online and health) where there are risks of radicalisation that we need to deal with.

    Prevent covers all forms of terrorism and extremism and some aspects of non-violent extremism. The Home Office works with local authorities,     a wide range of government departments, and community organisations to deliver the Prevent strategy. The police also play a significant role in     Prevent, in much the same way as they do when taking a preventative approach to other crimes.

    Prevent uses a range of measures to challenge extremism including: 

  • Supporting people who are at risk of being drawn into terrorist or extremist activity through the Channel process, see the What is Channel section to find out more about this
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  • Working with and supporting community groups and social enterprise projects who provide services and support to vulnerable people
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  • Working with faith groups and institutions to assist them in providing support and guidance to people who may be vulnerable; and
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  • Supporting local schools, local industry and partner agencies through engagement, advice and training.

    For more information and guidance when addressing this topic at home, please see the below link to power point used in student assemblies:

    Link

    Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

    Personal and social skills

    Child sexual exploitation (CSE) is a type of sexual abuse. Children in exploitative situations and relationships receive something such as gifts,     money or affection as a result of performing sexual activities or others performing sexual activities on them.

    Children or young people may be tricked into believing they're in a loving, consensual relationship. They might be invited to parties and given     drugs and alcohol. They may also be groomed and exploited online.

    Some children and young people are trafficked into or within the UK for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Sexual exploitation can also happen     to young people in gangs. Child sexual exploitation is a hidden crime. Young people often trust their abuser and don't understand that they're     being abused. They may depend on their abuser or be too scared to tell anyone what's happening.

    It can involve violent, humiliating and degrading sexual assaults. In some cases, young people are persuaded or forced into exchanging sexual     activity for money, drugs, gifts, affection or status. Child sexual exploitation doesn't always involve physical contact and can happen online.

    For more information and guidance when addressing this topic at home, please see the below link to power point used in student assemblies     and parent / carer presentations:

    Link